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Dr. John Sullivan
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Dr. John Sullivan is a well-known thought leader in HR. He is a frequent speaker and advisor to Fortune 500 and Silicon Valley firms. Formerly the chief talent officer for Agilent Technologies (the 43,000-employee HP spin-off), he is now a professor of management at San Francisco State University. He was called the "Michael Jordan of Hiring" by Fast Company magazine. More recruiting articles by Dr. Sullivan can be found in the ER Daily archives.

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I gotta admit, I was a little spellbound when I first read Talia Jane’s open letter to the CEO of Yelp, the company she worked for then (she was fired shortly after posting her story). I cringed on her behalf as I made my way through the piece. Just looking back at the...
“Jeff decided to ask the Compensation Committee to forgo his annual equity grant, and to instead put those shares back in the pool for LinkedIn employees.” Apparently, we may be seeing something here. After Twitter’s stock plummeted in October, CEO Jack Dorsey announced that he would give a third of his stock award...
What I’m hearing: LinkedIn has a new preferred partner program, and a list of preferred partners. Careerbuilder, part of reinventing itself, is buying Aurico. A job board — actually, it’s calling itself a candidate board — called Hooble is scheduled to go live in May. Laurie Correll is the
Today’s jobs report revealed strong gains for the U.S. workforce, but more importantly, the data shows there’s more room for this labor market to grow. The key is this: employers added 242,000 jobs, a strong number, and it came with essentially zero wage gains amid strong employer demand. In this environment, there’s definitely...
By Eric B. Meyer I recently blogged here about the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission‘s first lawsuits challenging sexual-orientation discrimination as sex discrimination. While part of the EEOC’s Strategic Enforcement Plan to address emerging and developing issues, getting federal courts to agree that sexual-
Whether or not incentive programs are effective has been a long standing question, spanning multiple academic disciplines. Some point to studies demonstrating the motivational potential of performance incentives, while others point to a “crowding-out” of intrinsic motivation when incentives are present. Given the data that has amassed

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